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Law students partner with Energy Bar Association to produce Energy Law Journal

The latest issue of The Energy Law Journal (ELJ), produced by students at The University of Tulsa College of Law and members of The Energy Bar Association, is now available online. It includes an article written by a TU College of Law student Taylor Moult titled, “Haphazard Federal Rulemaking Meets Judicial Review: Ballast Water Regulation Receives No Deference to Agency Interpretation.”

ELJ is a peer-reviewed legal publication that provides insightful, thought-provoking, relevant commentary on current issues involving federal and state regulatory and energy topics. Contributors include leading practitioners, key officials of federal and state regulatory agencies, federal judges and scholars.

Read the latest Energy Law Journal here.

According to Robert Butkin, law professor and director of the Sustainable Energy and Resource Law (SERL) program at TU, recent topics have included national and international energy and environmental policy, legal and regulatory issues, the relationship between federal and state regulatory systems and new developments in the regulation of oil and gas production in oil-producing states.

Created by the Energy Bar Association (EBA) and first published in 1980, ELJ’s readership includes more than 2,000 subscribers, who are leading practitioners, policymakers and academics from all other the world. The journal is published twice a year.

In 1986, a partnership was established between ELJ’s governing board and The University of Tulsa College of Law under which TU law students edit the publication. This successful partnership, now spanning more than three decades, has enabled hundreds of TU Law students to work closely with leading practitioners and government officials in the energy industry and has exposed students to cutting-edge policy and legal issues.

Learn more about TU Law’s two journals here.

The EBA board sets high standards for inclusion in the journal; and in the last five years, 13 TU law students have had articles selected for publication — a testament to their high-caliber work. The ELJ professional editors contribute to the students’ understanding by presenting at an annual workshop on energy law and policy for incoming ELJ members, and the professional board also provides funding to enable an ELJ student to serve as an intern on the staff of a congressman or senator who serves on an energy or environmental committee.

Students who have served on the journal have pursued successful career paths in the fields of energy and environmental law.  Recent ELJ alumni include an attorney with a major independent oil company in Tulsa, the director of energy policy with the National Association of Manufacturers, an assistant attorney general of Oklahoma working in the fields of energy and public utility regulation, and a staff attorney for the Environmental Defense Fund. This academic year, 25 2L (second year) law students have elected to join the ELJ which is more than one-fourth of the entire class.