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Cybersecurity law scholar Ido Kilovaty joins TU Law

Cybersecurity scholar Ido Kilovaty joins TU as the Frederic Dorwart Endowed Assistant Professor of Law.

Ido Kilovaty has been appointed to hold the Frederic Dorwart Endowed Assistant Professor of Law position at The University of Tulsa College of Law. He will teach cybersecurity law, internet law and international law.

Kilovaty comes to TU from Yale Law School where he was a Cyber Fellow for the Center for Global Legal Challenges, a Resident Fellow for the Information Society Project, and involved in co-teaching a course titled, “The Law & Technology of Cyber Conflict” offered both to law students and computer science majors.

“I am delighted to be joining The University of Tulsa College of Law,” said Kilovaty. “I am very much looking forward to be working with the outstanding faculty and students at Tulsa.”

Focuses on domestic and global cybersecurity.

Kilovaty studies the connection between technology, law and policy, with a focus on domestic and global cybersecurity. His recently authored “Freedom to Hack” which proposes a solution of ethical hacking for the improvement of smart-device security is forthcoming in the Ohio State Law Journal. He has also written on election interference through cyberspace, “Doxfare: – Politically Motivated Leaks and the Future of the Norm on Non-Intervention in the Era of Weaponized Information” appearing in the Harvard National Security Journal (2018).

Kilovaty’s recent scholarship includes – “NATO, ICRC, and the U.S. –Direct Participation in Hacktivities under International Humanitarian Law” (Duke Law & Technology Review); “World Wide Web of Exploitations—Peacetime Cyber Espionage under International Law” (Columbia Science & Technology Law Review); “Virtual Violence: Disruptive Cyber Operations as ‘Attacks’ under International Humanitarian Law” (Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review). Kilovaty has also published op-eds and essays in the Harvard Law Review Blog, Lawfare, Just Security, WIRED, and TechCrunch.

At Yale Law, Kilovaty developed a project to connect the legal and technical aspects of cybersecurity.

At Yale Law School, Kilovaty developed a cross-disciplinary project on cybersecurity bringing together lawyers, policymakers and technology experts to engage in constructive discourse on the current state of affairs on cybersecurity law and policy. The project was a collaboration between Yale Law School and Yale University’s Department of Computer Science designed to bridge the gaps between the legal and technical aspects of cybersecurity.

Kilovaty earned his Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) degree from Georgetown University Law Center, his Master of Laws (LL.M.) from the University of California Berkeley School Of Law, and his Bachelor of Laws LL.B.) from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

 

Famed attorney Jan Schlichtmann to speak at TU Law’s Richard B. Risk CLE Practicum Series

Jan Schlichtmann is a nationally known environmental and civil justice lawyer whose work has inspired a book and movie. Schlichtmann, named one of “The Best Lawyers in America” via peer review process, is coming to The University of Tulsa as part of the Richard B. Risk Continuing Legal Education Practicum Series.

Schlichtmann graduated from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1973 followed by a law degree from Cornell University in 1977. He began private practice in 1978 in Massachusetts and it did not take long for his work to be recognized.

Hear Schlichtmann speak Wednesday, April 4 at 6 p.m. in the Lorton Performance Center, free and open to the public.

Schlichtmann is most known for his work on the federal lawsuit Anderson v. Cryovac, Inc. where he represented eight families from Woburn, Massachusetts, in 1986. There were multiple instances of leukemia that affected each of the families and, after taking the case, Schlichtmann alleged from the evidence he found that the water was being contaminated by Cryovac, a subsidiary of W. R. Grace and Company; Beatrice Foods, the operator of a tannery; and UniFirst, a laundry service. UniFirst settled first and the money received from that company was put to the case against the other two. The jury found Beatrice not liable, but Schlichtmann received a settlement from Cryovac. This case and the events surrounding it were documented in the book A Civil Action written by Johnathan Harr in 1995. The book became a best seller, won the National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction and was made into a 1998 movie starring John Travolta as Jan Schlichtmann.

Since the case in Woburn, Schlichtmann has won many other cases and is known for his work in civil justice, science and the environment. In the late 1990s, he represented 69 Toms River, New Jersey families, who claimed that their children had developed cancer from pollution by three companies. They reached a settlement in 2001. Schlichtmann was also a co-founder of the Legal Broadcast Network (LBN) in 2004. LBN helps bring attention to important issues of law through blogs and podcasts

Schlichtmann has also lectured at many law schools and conferences offering his insights from his experiences. Schlichtmann’s Tulsa lecture is titled, “Justice & The Lawyer – Lessons from the Environmental Wars.”

TU Law alumnus Dick Risk makes the TU Law CLE Practicum Series possible.

Prior to the lecture, there was a private reception and showing of A Civil Action at the Circle Cinema with lecture sponsor and TU law alumnus, Richard “Dick” Risk, in attendance. TU law students, alumni and lecture registrants were invited.

Risk graduated from Oklahoma State University in 1963 and decided to attend law school in 1998. After graduating in 2001 at age 60, he decided to start his own solo practice. He settled a large class action suit early in his law career and wanted to do something for TU so he used part of the settlement to create an endowment for the law school in 2011. “At then-Dean Janet Levit’s suggestion, we created a practicum series to help new graduates of the law school learn things about practicing law that the law school doesn’t teach,” said Risk.

These regular lectures are available to students, the Tulsa legal community and anyone with interest in law. Risk wanted to add special lecture to the series. He said, “I suggested to Dean Lyn Entzeroth that we should consider in addition to the regular noon series having a speaker who would be recognized by the general public to talk about the virtues of the legal profession and its positive impact on our society. I immediately thought of Jan Schlichtmann, and I’m thrilled he accepted my invitation for this event.” Risk had heard Schlichtmann speak at two different seminars and thought he was a powerful speaker and a delightful person. “Jan and I are both advocates for truth and justice, and I am honored that he will be the first evening lecture sponsored by the Risk Practicum Series,” said Risk.

There will be a reception at 5:30 p.m. in the lobby of the Lorton Performance Center preceding Jan Schlichtmann’s lecture at 6 p.m. and the event is free and open to the public.

TU Law alumna & immigration attorney named winner of Fern Holland Award

The TU College of Law’s Women’s Law Caucus has selected immigration attorney and TU Law alumna Lorena Rivas as the recipient of the 2018 Fern Holland Award for her work in human rights and the empowerment of women.
Immigration attorney Lorena Rivas, an alumna of The University of Tulsa College of Law, is the 2018 Fern Holland Award winner.

The annual award is named for Fern Holland, who at 33 years of age, sacrificed her life nurturing Iraq’s fledgling democracy. A courageous and dedicated graduate of The University of Tulsa College of Law, Fern used her legal training to fight for human rights around the world. Fern’s last assignment was in Iraq as program manager for Women’s Initiatives for the Coalition Provisional Authority. On March 9, 2004, while returning from a visit to the Zainab al-Hawraa Center for Women’s Rights in Karbala-which she had assisted in founding only months before-her vehicle was ambushed by Iraqi extremists. Fern and her two colleagues were killed by a hail of bullets, in what appears to have been a targeted assassination. Read more about Holland here.

Get more information about the 2018 Fern Holland Banquet

The following article was first published in the Tulsa Business & Legal News.

As an attorney and the daughter of two Mexican nationals, Lorena Rivas admires Fern Holland’s accomplishments.

Fourteen years ago this month Holland, a University of Tulsa law school alumna and Oklahoma native was shot to death along with a journalist and a translator while working on behalf of the U.S. government and the Iraqi Coalition Provisional Authority to quell human-rights abuses in Iraq.

Rivas, a 2012 TU Law grad, is this year’s Fern Holland Award winner and will be recognized during a banquet at 6 p.m. Thursday at The Pearl District building, 1209 E. Third St. The honor, presented by the TU College of Law’s Women’s Law Caucus, is given to a lawyer who advocates for human rights or the empowerment of women.

Learn more about TU Law’s Immigration Program

Holland “was an amazing individual,” said Rivas, an immigration attorney and partner with Fry & Elder. “She was willing to lose her life while fighting for a very worthy cause and the voiceless. I hope that when I’m gone, people will look at my life and think something similar: ‘She was willing to tell the stories of the voiceless and fight for them.’ In my case, it’s immigrants.”

Originally from the northwestern Oklahoma town of Mutual, Rivas said her parents support and inspire her work on behalf of immigrants in the United States. She also realizes she has her work cut out for her.

“Unfortunately, the current administration and political climate, especially the acceptance of racism as normal, has made the practice of immigration law extremely disheartening,” she said. “Immigration law has always been complex and challenging, but it was not as punitive as it is now. The word ‘immigrant’ is now considered a dirty word and label.”

Rivas said the toughest aspect is educating others — even other attorneys and judges — about the realities of immigration law. She is a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association and focuses her work on the complicated immigration laws in the United States.

She also participated in TU’s Immigration Rights Legal Clinic while in law school. She helped prevent a Haitian national from being returned to Haiti, in terrible conditions due to the recent earthquake and hurricane, and a mother and her two children remain in the U.S. after being victims of domestic and sexual abuse in Mexico.

“Every day I receive a call from an employer who contacts me about helping their good, hardworking employee gain lawful status in the United States,” she said. “They often tell me their employees are not like the criminal immigrants that need to be deported. Unfortunately, all immigrants are being deported from the United States, regardless of family ties to the United States and lack of criminal record.

“When I explain this to these employers, they are shocked to learn how callous our immigration system is and how this administration has escalated the deportation machine.”

Still, Rivas remains optimistic.

“Despite all this, I do see good things on the horizon for immigrants in the U.S., and this is all because I believe in the power of immigrants,” she said. “The current political climate has not only stirred and awakened hateful voices, but it also has stirred and awakened the hopeful and persistent voices of everyday immigrant-rights activists.

“Not only am I a minority in the field of law because I am a woman, but also because I am a Latina,” she said. “Being a good representative for both minority groups is very important to me.

“While I hate that I feel that I have to push myself harder because I am a Hispanic female in a field largely dominated by men, until that is no longer the case, we have no choice but to work harder until we have inspired enough females and minorities to join us and continue our journey toward diversity and progress.”

 

TU Law rated a Best Value Law School by preLaw magazine

The University of Tulsa College of Law has earned a spot on preLaw Magazine’s annual list of Best Value Law Schools. It honors law schools that keep student debt manageable while providing a quality education so students can pass the bar and get legal jobs.

“With legal education seeing dramatic turmoil, we celebrate those schools that have risen to the challenge and continue to offer affordable, quality education,” said Mike Stetz of preLaw and The National Jurist. The Best Value Law School ranking was calculated using 2016 data on tuition, bar passage and employment rates as supplied to the American Bar Association by each law school. This year, only 62 schools made preLaw’s list.

TU Law is a selective Top 100 law school as ranked by the U.S. News & World Report, 2018. The school offers an excellent, highly personalized education rooted in practical experience. Visit us for more information on TU Law, our faculty, admission opportunities and an application fee waiver.